Monthly Archives: March 2014

Spring into Seasonal Fruit and Vegetables

It is hard to believe that spring is here (literally). With the start of a new season means different fruits and vegetables are in season as well. As far as fruits and vegetables go, spring is considered to be March, April and May. When a fruit or vegetable is in season it means is at its peak of flavor or harvest. Not only will the flavor be optimal the price will be the cheapest. Next time you head out to the grocery store be sure to try some of the following items that are in season right now!

strawberriessnow peasmango

Remember, you can enjoy the taste of any fruit or vegetable year-round by using fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and 100% juice – it all counts!

Apricots 
Artichokes 
Asparagus 
Barbados Cherries
Belgian Endive
Bitter Melon
Broccoli
Butter Lettuce
Cactus
Chayote Squash 
Cherimoya
Chives
Collard Greens
Corn
Fava Beans
Fennel
Fiddlehead Ferns
Green Beans
Honeydew
Jackfruit
Limes
Lychee 
Mango
Manoa Lettuce
Morel Mushrooms
Mustard Greens
Oranges 
Pea Pods
Peas
Pineapple
Purple Asparagus
Radicchio
Ramps
Red Leaf Lettuce
Rhubarb 
Snow Peas
Sorrel
Spinach
Spring Baby Lettuce
Strawberries
Swiss Chard
Vidalia Onions
Watercress
White Asparagus
 
limesartichokeswiss chardpineapple

Reference: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.com

 

Running with Lynn Show

Good morning UND!

Welcome back students!! Today, we are looking for a high of 32 and a low of 20 with sunny skies looking to wrap up the month of March.

There is no better way to end march then by going to a movie! What is the movie this week you may ask? Noah. In a world ravaged by human sin, Noah is given a divine mission: to build an Ark to save creation from the coming flood. Starring Russel Crowe, and Emma Watson, this great story will keep your eyes wide open all 2 hours and 00 min.

Now for another epic tale from Stories of Suspense. This week Stories of Suspense brings you “The Unwashed hands”.

Last week a buddy and I went out to eat. When we got to the restaurant, the hostess showed us to our table, and just as we sat down my friend stood up and walked right to the restroom. A few minutes go by, and he came back to the table and asked the server “that sign in the bathroom, ‘Must Wash Hands’ that’s just for the employees right?” The server stared, squinted his eyes, and paused and said “Technically yeah”. My buddy responds “oh good” as he grabs some bread with his bare hands and asked so innocently, “Do you want some?” “I screamed, No…..!”

The End.

have a great day everybody

Sip, Swallow, and Chug: Watch what you drink on prescription drugs!

It might sound crazy to some, but in fact, a lot of a prescription drugs are affected by what you drink.  ImageAccording to the FDA (the Food and Drug Administration), “what you eat and drink can affect the way your medicines work” (fda.org).  This could mean a number of different things, from the development of a side effect previously unaffiliated with the medication or causing the medication to not work or do its job properly.  Interactions between prescription medications and food and drink are not something we usually think about.  Instead, we either only pay attention to what interactions may occur with whatever other medications and herbs we are presently taking, or we don’t think about it at all.

There are numerous dangers to mixing alcohol with prescription medications. Some of these dangers include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Memory trouble after having a drink or taking medicine
  • Loss of coordination (walking unsteadily, frequent falls)
  • Changes in sleeping habits 
  • Unexplained bruises 
  • Being unsure of yourself 
  • Irritability, sadness, depression 
  • Unexplained chronic pain
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Wanting to stay alone a lot of the time
  • Failing to bathe or keep clean
  • Having trouble finishing sentences 
  • Having trouble concentrating 
  • Difficulty staying in touch with family or friends
  • Lack of interest in usual activities (niaa.nih.gov)

What makes mixing with medications an even greater threat is that some medications already include alcohol, as much as 10% (niaaa.nih.gov). 

The below link is a guide published through the FDA that tells you prescriptions to avoid mixing with alcoholic beverages. I would encourage everyone to check it out and abide by what it has to say.

http://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/resourcesforyou/consumers/buyingusingmedicinesafely/ensuringsafeuseofmedicine/generaluseofmedicine/ucm229033.pdf

Kick the Butts’ Butt

On Wednesday, March 19th, anti-tobacco activists everywhere will be acknowledging the annual “Kick Butts Day.” Kick Butts Day is a day focused on standing up and speaking out against both tobacco use and the tobacco industry. All across the world, people will be holding all kinds of different anti-tobacco related events.  The primary goal of most of these events is to encourage current tobacco users to quit using tobacco for good. whatisincig

The benefits of quitting tobacco use are numerous, and it is important to investigate the options out there for helping you quit if you choose. Here at UND, there are plenty of resources. At the Health and Wellness Hub, located in the Memorial Union, users will find “Quit Kits” available.  Users can also check out Student Health Services to discuss the process of quitting tobacco, and perhaps get a check up to see how at risk you might be for tobacco induced health problems. Across North Dakota, the Department of Health has also established the “ND Quits” campaign.  Users interested in quitting can check out the campaign’s website or dial the toll free number to get access to free resources available for quitting.

The good news is that all across the U.S., tobacco use is decreasing. Compared to 42% of the population reporting regular tobacco use in 1965, in 2012, the percentage was reported to be 10%. (kickbuttsday.org) So, if you’re interested in quitting, please do your lungs a favor and check out these fabulous resources!

www.kickbuttsday.org (the official website for “Kick Butts Day”)

http://www.ndhealth.gov/ndquits/  (the official website for the ND Quits campaign)

1.800.784.8669 (ND Quits hotline)

701-777-2605 (UND Student Health Services)

Running with Lynn Show

Good afternoon UND! Looking like a chilly day and not much sun yet…. BUT we have a high of 33! Spring is on the way!

The movie of the week …Everyone start your engines! – “Need For Speed” This muscle car, fast action movie, will have your heart at full throttle all 2 hours and 10 min.

I have an interesting nutrition related message for all you people out there for National Nutrition Month!
Did you know that you burn more calories eating celery than it contains?

And now you know and knowing is half the battle….
– Have a great day everybody!

-Lynn

Lettuce Eat Green

As I drove to work, I realized I had no visible green on so I quickly thought about what I could do to avoid being pinched all day (stick a green post-it note on my shirt? tell people they just can’t see my green? take a green sharpie to my skin? convince people my eyes are green?) . So far, I’ve successfully dodged each playful reminder of St. Patty’s Day.

Truthfully though? Seeing all of this green makes me hungry.
(Well, a lot of things have that same effect on me… but green really gets me.)

You see, I.Love.Vegetables.

If you opened my fridge on a Sunday night (the day I usually grocery shop), you might find an average of 10 heads of lettuce. Yes, TEN. (Please pick your jaw off the keyboard.) I bet I’m one of the few people that gets asked “Are you having a party?” every time I go through the checkout with all of my green goodness. Sometimes I’ll come up with different tall tales that I could tell the cashier to avoid telling them that they are actually just for me. Other times, I could not care less!

When I was 16 and 300 pounds, I could finish off a large Pizza Corner pizza by myself. A bag of Doritos or container of Oreos was about an hour’s worth of a TV show…. I guess my point is that my appetite has always been rather large.

I tell people that even though I’ve lost 100 pounds, my stomach hasn’t shrunk. Sometimes I tell myself that I’m going to work harder at portion control, but that usually ends by lunch time when I’m chowing down on my head of lettuce. My husband jokes that I can make anything into a salad.
And he’s right.

If you aren’t the most fond of vegetables, I speak from experience when I tell you that lettuce can be a great way to ease into this colorful, nutritious world of goodness. It is refreshing, crispy, and most kinds don’t carry too much flavor- a great way to “bulk up” a meal.

LETTUCE have some Fun:

  • Lettuce is a member of the sunflower family and was discovered as a weed growing around the Mediterranean.
  • Christopher Columbus introduced lettuce to the Americas.
  • In the United States, lettuce is the second most popular fresh vegetable. Americans eat about 30 pounds of lettuce every year. That’s about five times more than what we ate in the early 1900’s.

LETTUCE eat More!

  • Lettuce provides fiber and vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, potassium, vitamin C, calcium, iron, and copper.
  • The most abundant nutrient in iceberg lettuce is water (over 90%), so it can help to keep you hydrated as the temperatures go up (I mean, it’s bound to get warmer eventually).
  • The darker the green color is, the more nutrition the salad greens contain.
  • A head of Iceberg lettuce will last longer if you wrap it in a paper towel and place it in a plastic bag in your fridge.

To me, the best part about working with lettuce as an ingredient is the creativity involved. I have yet to find something that I do not enjoy on a bed of greens (I even invented a little dish I like to call “soup IN a salad,” and it is exactly what it sounds like- 100% delish!). While dressings can be a delicious addition, be sure to read your nutrition label, as the calories and fat add up quickly (thus defeating the purpose).

The weather is starting to improve and I think it’s all giving us a brighter outlook; a great time to start taking steps to feel better- inside and out. And as with all things, even baby steps add up! Have a Healthy, Happy GREEN St. Patty’s Day!

 Baby Steps

Source: http://www.extension.umn.edu

Mid March Blog Blast!

Hey, all you bloggers!

UND’s Spring Break is upon us!! I sincerely hope every person reading this blog, student or otherwise, enjoys their upcoming week. I’ve been looking forward to this since… I don’t know…. Spring semester started!

We’ve rolled out quite a few classes since I’ve last posted a Blog Blast, and I apologize for that. Recently, in Cheap, Fast, and Healthy, we’ve cooked up Honey Fried Bananas (the kitchen smelt AMAZING from this recipe) and Black Bean and Corn Quesadillas.

Here’s a look at those tasty quesadillas!

IMG_20140311_174503_528

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Chili was the featured entree in Crock Pot Cooking last week.

We also recently held a reservation for Kappa Alpha Theta at Culinary Corner to celebrate their graduating seniors. Two instructors lead the 19 KAT seniors through Fruit Pizza and Chocolate Mint Trifle recipes. Unfortunately, we didn’t have a trifle dish for the chocolate dessert, but the girls made the best of the situation and made it look awesome anyway!

photo 1 (3) photo 2 (3)

photo 4

 

photo 3

 

Feel free to take a breather and wipe that drool off your chin.

 

Until next time, bloggers!!

Drunkorexia

Drunkorexia is a fairly new phenomenon where an individual limits daily calorie intake in order to be able to “drink” their calories.  Usually, this is done in an effort to drink alcohol without gaining weight. There are multiple risks associated with drunkorexia.  Drinking on an empty stomach will get you drunk faster, but this in turn reduces self-control and can lead to a night of making bad decisions.  Binge eating, however, may follow because the individual is extremely hungry and having trouble controlling urges.  Unfortunately, purging frequently follows the binge eating session. By limiting your daily calorie intake, individuals may not be getting nutrients needed to function properly during every day activities. 

If you find yourself struggling with drunkorexia, here are some helpful tips: Martini

Moderation: Eat in moderation and you will not have to worry about limiting your calories in order to enjoy a drink or two.

Limits: Set limits on how much you will drink, and keep track of how many drinks you consume throughout an evening. (As a general rule for low-risk drinking, try to keep it to no more than three drinks in one sitting).

Choices: Choose drinks with a lower calorie content. Many mixed drinks are filled with sugar and loaded with calories.There are many options for low calorie beer.

Healthy Lifestyle: Eating healthy and exercising on a regular basis are the best ways to manage weight- you do not need to deprive yourself a meal!

Support: If you find yourself struggling ask family, friends, or seek professional help.  UND offers free counseling services to students.

UND offers many resources to students beyond the University Counseling Center.  These resources include: Student Health Services, Residence Services, University Police Department, Dean of Students (CARE team).  If you would like to find out more information about these services look under the alcohol tab on the Heath & Wellness Hub homepage (http://und.edu/health-wellness/hub/alcohol.cfm).

Runing With Lynn Show

Good morning UND!

It’s looking like another sunny day with a high of 30. Spring break is just around the corner and for those not going on vacation this year here are a few tips on how to stay busy. You could learn how to trade stocks, write your life story, or take up tap dancing. Catch up on movies you have missed. Here are a few of my favorite dramatic films; Good Fellas, Donnie Brasco, and The Departed. Or try a “laugh out loud” movie like Anger Management, License To Drive, or  The Three Amigos. Not a fan of comedy? Try movies that rock, Rock Star, La Bamba, The Ritchie Valens Story, and Night at the Roxbury.

Hey everybody tomorrow is Ear Muff Day.
When : Always March 13th; origin of “Ear Muff Day”:
Big-eared Chester Greenwood is the father of the Earmuff. Greenwood patented the “Champion Ear Protector” on March 13, 1877. It later became known as “ear mufflers”, and was eventually shortened to “earmuffs”. (“Now you know, and knowing is half the battle.”) –Gi Joe!

Have a great break everybody.

What do you do when you’re sick with the flu?

We all get sick from time to time. Sometime it is just a minor cold – which is expected when living in this frozen tundra. Sometimes, however, it is the flu (AKA influenza) – a respiratory illness caused by a virus. Flu is highly contagious and is usually spread by people coughing and sneezing around you. The virus then becomes airborne and can be inhaled by anyone nearby. You can also get the flu if you touch a contaminated surface like a phone or a doorknob and then touch your nose or mouth.

Adults are contagious one day before getting symptoms and up to 7 days after becoming ill which means that you can spread the flu virus not even knowing that you are infected. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), between 5% and 20% of Americans get the flu each year.

So how do you know it is flu? The most common symptoms of the flu are:

– Fever: 100-102°F lasting 3-4 days

– Headaches

– Muscle or body aches

– Fatigue/weakness lasting 2-3 weeks

– Extreme exhaustion at onset of virus

– Chest discomfort and cough, especially if it becomes severe

– Rare: vomiting or diarrhea

– Occasional symptoms might include stuffy nose, sneezing, and sore throat. However, these symptoms are more likely to be the common cold rather than flu.

Complications of the flu can be life threatening, such as bacterial pneumonia, ear infection, sinus infection, dehydration, or worsening of chronic medical conditions like congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized and 36,000 die annually because of flu in the United States, according to NIH.

To avoid these unpleasant symptoms and terrible complications that can prevent you from studying and having social life, there are a couple of things you can do to recover faster:

1. Blow your nose often and right away: gently blow while plugging the other nostril to avoid irritation.

2. Stay rested: sleeping and relaxing helps the body direct energy toward the immunity battle internally.

3. Gargle: moistens a sore throat and brings temporary relief, 1 tsp. of salt per cup of water 4 times per day.

4. Drink hot liquids: relieves nasal congestion and helps prevent dehydration, soothes inflamed membranes that line the nose and throat.

5. Take a steamy shower: moisturizes your nasal passages and relaxes you.

6. Apply hot/cold packs around congested sinuses: either temperature may help you feel more comfortable.

7. Sleep with an extra pillow under your head: helps drain nasal passages.

8. Don’t fly unless necessary: added air pressure puts more stress on your respiratory system.

9. Stay at home and rest 24 hours AFTER a fever has broken: prevent the spread of the flu!

The best way to prevent the flu is to get vaccinated early! Flu season usually starts in October and it takes about two weeks for the protective properties of the vaccine to take effect. By being vaccinated, you help your body to build antibodies to fight off the infection easier. To schedule your appointment, call Student Health at (701)777-4500.

Also, don’t forget to wash your hands, eat healthy, exercise, and clean your work space. It will greatly reduce your risk of getting the flu. Stay healthy and away from this virus!

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