Monthly Archives: April 2013

Runnin with Lynn Show

Good morning UND hows it going today? looking at a very nice day today plenty of sunshine. The movie of the week Iron Man III an action-packed good vs. evil movie on the big screen. {Dating} Last night I’m on my third date with this women and things are not going good, I know she’s going to break up with me. Then all of a sudden she starts giving me the “it’s not you, its me line”. I said sugar you’re giving me the “it’s not you its me line” I invented. It’s not you its me if it’s any one its me she’s say alright its you, your darn right its me.
have a good day everyone!

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Protein

Protein has many functions in our body and is necessary for normal body function, but how much is enough?

Protein provides structure to muscles and other tissues, it acts as regulators of cell functions, assists in maintaining fluid and acid-base balance, transports substances throughout the body and it can serve as an energy source when needed.   Protein is very important for muscle recovery and basic body function but believe it or not, more is NOT better.

protein

Protein intake is not a one size fits all formula, athletes generally require a greater protein intake than normal sedentary individuals.  The daily recommended intake (DRI) for protein is .8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight or 10-35% of daily calories.  Since one gram of protein consists of 4 calories, this would be 200-700 grams of protein every day for a 2000 calorie diet.  Requirements for protein intake vary based on a number of factors, some of them being:

  • Body weight
  • Energy intake
  • Desire to lose/gain weight
  • Exercise intensity and duration
  • Quality of dietary protein
  • Age

According to “Practical Applications in Sports Nutrition third edition” On average, this is how much protein should be consumed according to different level of activity:

  • Sedentary individuals:  12-15% of calories
  • Strength athlete: 15-20% of calories
  • Endurance athlete:  12-18% of calories
  • Team Sport athlete: 12-16% of calories
  • Weight gain/loss: 16-20% of calories

It is important to not exceed 35% of calories from protein.  Increased protein intake can have detrimental effects on an individual’s body.  Excess protein can put extra stress on an individual’s kidneys.  This is because our kidneys filter urea, which is a waste product of protein metabolism.  An abundance of urea can place unneeded stress on one’s kidneys.    Increased protein intake can also cause dehydration.  The breaking of peptide bonds, which occurs when protein is being broken down in our bodies, requires water.  This cause our body to use the water that may be needed to keep our cells hydrated.  Some protein sources are very high in fat, such as meat and nut products.  High fat can cause increase calorie consumption resulting in weight gain.  If one consumes a high protein diet, it can often displace other food groups, which may cause a deficit in essential vitamins and minerals.  Also, large amounts of one particular protein source, which often occurs when protein supplements are consumed, can affects absorption of other types of protein in the digestive tract.

Some good sources of protein include:

  • ½ cup of pasta: 3.5 g.
  • ½ cup of broccoli: 1.3 g.
  • Skim milk: 8 g.
  • 3 oz. chicken: 27 g.
  • 1 ½ cup of Lentils: 27 g.

 

Katie Olson

 References

Fink, Heather Hedrick., Alan E. Mikesky, and Lisa A. Burgoon. “Chaper 5 Proteins.” Practical Applications in Sports Nutrition. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2012. N. pag. Print

UND launches new webpage as resource to help students in distress

College.  Highlights for most students include meeting new friends, getting involved on campus and becoming socially engaged.

While college is a wonderful time for most students, some students may struggle. Distressed students may initially seek assistance from faculty, staff members, their parents and other students. They may be found in the classroom, at home or within residence halls.

UND Cares is a webpage that was created as a resource guide for parents, staff, faculty and students because UND cares about distressed students or students in need. The webpage can be used to gather information about campus resources, make referrals, and demonstrate how to help each other in time of need.

The webpage also helps students, faculty, staff and parents learn about the professional support se

rvices available to students on campus through the Dean of Students and University Counseling Center. Both are available to provide consultation about providing a student with the help that he or she may need.

“Sometimes we may be concerned about a student, a friend or a loved one and we don’t know what to do or who to call,” said Cara Halgren, UND associate vice president and dean of students. “If you are concerned about someone in our community, please call us. We can help.”

According to the UND 2012 American College Health Association – National College Heath Assessment, in the past year:

  • 21.3 percent of UND students felt so depressed it was difficult to function.
  • 6 .9 percent seriously considered suicide.
  • 1.5 percent attempted suicide.
  • More than 1 in 4 students indicated that stress interfered with their academic success.

    Amberkay Crotts (left), a student employee, and  Napoleon Andriopoulos, Ph.D., psychology resident and UND staff psychologist, discuss issues related to student stress in the UND Counseling Center inside McCannel Hall.

    Amberkay Crotts (left), a student employee, and Napoleon Andriopoulos, Ph.D., psychology resident and UND staff psychologist, discuss issues related to student stress in the UND Counseling Center inside McCannel Hall.

Stress has been the No. 1 academic impact cited by UND students since the survey was started in 2000, according to the Dean of Students office.

Identifying warning signs of distress is the first step in knowing how to help.  These can include:

  • Significant changes in daily activities.
  • Cut off or minimized contact with family or friends.
  • Significant changes in performance or involvement in academics, sports, extracurricular or social activities.
  • Problems that result from experiences with drinking or drugs.
  • Withdrawn, volatile, tearful or emotional behavior
  • Acting out of character
  • Talking explicitly about hopelessness or suicide
  • Difficulty in concentrating or carrying on normal conversation
  • Excessive dependence on others for company or support
  • feeling out of control in regard to emotions, thoughts or behaviors

“At least one-tenth of the student population finds their way through our doors.  Maybe they were encouraged, maybe they heard about the Counseling Center. Whatever brought them to us, the counseling center is here for you or someone you care about,” said Myron Veenstra, director of the UND Counseling Center.

Amberkay Crotts (left) student employee, and Lisa Moore, administrative assistant, serve to welcome students and others in the UND community to the Counseling Center inside McCannel Hall.

Amberkay Crotts (left) student employee, and Lisa Moore, administrative assistant, serve to welcome students and others in the UND community to the Counseling Center inside McCannel Hall.

Services at the UND Counseling Center are free and confidential for enrolled students.

“College can take a while to adjust to; it’s nice knowing that there are people out there that truly care about the hardships you are going through,” said UND student Kyle See-Rockers,  president of Sigma Phi Epsilon.

The University of North Dakota has tools to help identify students with those warning signs. It’s important to know where to direct them for help.  UND Cares can help improve a college career and even save a life.

“The safety and overall well-being of our campus is a responsibility that is shared by all university community members,” Eric Plummer, UND director of public safety and chief of police. “ Remember if you see something, say something in order for us to work together to make an exceptional UND.”

UND hosts two nationally renowned experts on campus-community alcohol and other drug issues

An Exceptional UND enriches the entire student experience, both inside the classroom
and out. High-risk alcohol and other drug use can compromise student health and wellness and
therefore, student learning. It’s important that we understand what all of us can do as a campus
community to help students make healthy choices. Conversations like this can help.
– Dr. Steve Light, UND Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
and Dr. Lori Reesor, Vice President for Student Affairs

The University of North Dakota is hosting two nationally renowned experts on campus-community alcohol and other drug issues, Dr. Jason Kilmer and Linda Major, for a series of presentations/open forums. We invite you to learn about what works for other campuses and be a part of the conversation on alcohol and other drug issues at UND.

Student Conversation
Sunday, April 28th, 6:30 p.m.
Memorial Union Badlands Room
Pizza will be served.

Campus Community (faculty, staff, and students) Presentation/Conversation
Monday, April 29, 11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Swanson 10-12
Light lunch provided at 11:45 a.m. Presentation begins at noon.

Faculty Presentation/Conversation
Monday, April 29th, 4:00 p.m.
Memorial Union Badlands Room

Community Presentation/Conversation
Monday, April 29th, 7:00 p.m.
Grand Forks City Hall Council Chambers, 255 N 4th Street

Linda Major and Jason Kilmer
Linda Major currently serves as Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Director for the Center for Civic Engagement at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where she is responsible for coordinating a comprehensive approach to address high-risk behaviors on the campus and in the community. Dr. Jason Kilmer currently works at the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and serves as an investigator on several studies evaluating prevention and intervention efforts for alcohol and other drug use by college students.

These events are sponsored by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Health and Wellness Unit, Healthy UND Alcohol and Other Drugs Committee, UND Athletics, Dean of Students Office, Greek Life, Residence Services, and the University Police Department. The community presentation is sponsored by the City of Grand Forks, the Grand Forks Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition and the University of North Dakota. For additional information contact the Health & Wellness Hub at 701.777.2097 or und.hwhub@email.und.edu

Community Alcohol Abuse Prevention Presentation/Conversation set for Monday, April 29

Grand Forks area residents are invited to attend an alcohol abuse prevention presentation and open forum by nationally renowned experts Linda Major and Jason Kilmer, at 7 p.m., Monday, April 29, in the Grand Forks City Hall Council Chambers, 255 N 4th Street.

Major and Kilmer will share information about what has worked on a national level and in other communities. Citizens will have an opportunity to voice concerns and learn how they can have an influence this issue in our community.

Members of the Grand Forks community have expressed increasing interest in alcohol-related concerns that face our community, particularly binge and underage drinking and their associated negative consequences.

“One reason we are a great community,” said Michael R. Brown, Mayor, “is that we actively promote the health and well-being of our residents. We appreciate this and future opportunities to partner with the University of North Dakota, the Grand Forks Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition, and other community members on this important issue.”

Lori Reesor, UND Vice President for Student Affairs, explained, “It’s important that we understand what all of us can do as a campus and as a community to help encourage healthy choices. Conversations like this can help.”

Grand Forks Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition chairperson, Mary Lien stated “This is our town, these are our youth, and it’s about our community coming together to recognize the positive and change the negative impacts of the serious consequences of alcohol abuse. Let’s continue to build a better and healthier community for all residents.”

Linda Major and Jason Kilmer

Major currently serves as Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and Director for the Center for Civic Engagement at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she is responsible for coordinating a comprehensive approach to address high-risk behaviors on the campus and in the community.

Kilmer currently works at the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and serves as an investigator on several studies evaluating prevention and intervention efforts for alcohol and other drug use by college students.

Taking the Reigns

When it comes to having a career, there are some people who will find themselves in the right place at the right time. With little effort, they will rise to the top.

And then there are most people.
The ones that work hard gain experience, build a network, and make the educated choices. Blood, sweat, and (and maybe even a few tears) bring success.

This is why it’s important to set yourself up as much as you can.

Within the Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals’ organization, we believe in the importance of professional development, whether you’re still a student or several years into your career. And we often share opportunities with a variety of people to enhance skills and build a bigger network.

We are excited to have a bevy of opportunities for the community (that means YOU) in the coming weeks:
1. Monday, April 22nd from 3-5pm at AE2S (4050 Garden View Drive- across from the Alerus Center)
LINK

LINK is a program designed to connect students with professionals in the same discipline to encourage career awareness, establish mentorships and networking opportunities, provide project support and resources, and strengthen university/community collaboration and support.

The Sustainability panel presentation will begin at 3 p.m., with the LINK Networking event to follow, on Monday, April 22 at AE2S (4050 Garden View Drive) in the second floor training room. Please RSVP at: http://bit.ly/Xg2FFc.

Thanks to our partners: The Center for Community Engagement, The Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals, Grand Forks Region Economic Development Corporation, and UND Aerospace (Earth System Science and Policy)

 

2. On Tuesday we will hold one of our Executive Briefings, featuring Dave Molmen, the CEO of Altru Health System. The April 23rd event is scheduled from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Altru Hospital Board Room – located just down the stairs or elevator from the Hospital Main Lobby (1200 S. Columbia Rd.). It will begin with a brief overview and walking tour of one of our key departments/services. The group will then return to the Board Room for a presentation and discussion by Dave Molmen.

Finally, on Friday May 10th we will host Leadercast, which you can attend for FREE. This one-of-a-kind event will be broadcast live from Atlanta and simulcast into communities across the globe. Join more than 125,000 leaders from around the world as we learn to Simply Lead. The first session will begin at 8:00am and the program will conclude at 3:45pm.
2013 Speakers include:
Condoleezza Rice (Secretary of State {2005-2009}Exclusive Simply Lead video interview with John C. Maxwell)
David Allen (Best-selling author of Getting Things Done and productivity expert)
Sanya Richards-Ross (2012 London Olympic gold medalist, track & field)
LCDR Rorke Denver (Navy SEAL and star of the 2012 movie Act of Valor)
Dr. Henry Cloud (Best-selling author and leadership consultant)
John C. Maxwell (Best-selling author and leadership expert)
Mike Krzyzewski (Head men’s basketball coach, Duke University and Team USA)
Andy Stanley (Best-selling leadership author & communicator)
Jack Welch (Former Chairman & CEO of General Electric)
If you’re interested in attending, contact me.

Remember that you play an important role in shaping your future. Rather than sitting on the sidelines, set yourself up for success by participating in career and character-building opportunities like these!

The Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals are both young and young at heart. We care about our community, and we represent the interests of the 20-40 year olds in our area. We are made up of college students, pencil pushers, parents, and people whose collars come in many colors. We love living here and we think other people should too. We plan events throughout the year for our members to network and learn. Through our committees, our members are able to get involved in both GGFYP and the community. For more information, contact: www.ggfyp.com.

Runnin with Lynn Show

Good morning UND looking like another nice day very sunny. The movie of the week Star Trek Into Darkness an action packed outer space blockbuster adventure on the big screen, a must see at the show hall. So my little sister tells me she is getting married, I thought oh boy I better have a talk with my future brother-in-law, set him straight. So I meet [lets call him Thomas] at the diner I say Tom are you sure you know what you’re doing? He said yea I want to get married, why wouldn’t I? They’re prisons, man-made prisons your doing time, you go to sleep she’s there…you wake up she’s there…. its like you have to ask permission to use the bathroom…. and you can forget about eating dinner in front of the tv, you know why because its dinner time and you know what you do at dinner time, you talk about your day! (was it a good day or was it a bad day well what kind of day was it?) Wow im glad we had this talk, you got no idea!
have a good day everybody

SHS has been Awarded as a Vaccine Storage and Handling Champion for the State of North Dakota

SHS has been Awarded as a Vaccine Storage and Handling Champion for the State of North Dakota.

Running with Lynn Show

Good morning UND looking like a nice day today- a high of 30. I hope everyone had a nice weekend. I was in the rugby clinic this weekend and you know what I felt comfortable. I was in a small room just me and the Dr. I don’t think anyone wants to be in a big room, you know one of those rooms where people say I got to see this! you ever heard of these operating theaters, people watch an operation. How do they work these events, do people scalp tickets to shows? (I got two for the Winslow tumor I got two!)
The movie of the week is the Evil Dead. It is a classic movie written back in the ’70s. If you are looking for a scary movie to watch – this is it. I mean a real scary movie. The kind of scary movie where you are always looking under your bed at night. Have a great day everybody!

Basketball and Indoor Soccer Champions

We recently saw the conclusion of the Spring 2013 Basketball and Indoor Soccer Championships!

Basketball Champions

CoRec Basketball - Havoc

CoRec Basketball – Havoc

Men's D1 Champion - Bombers

Men’s D1 Basketball – Bombers

Men's D2 - Northern Lights

Men’s D2 Basketball – Northern Lights

PICTURE COMING SOON

Women’s Basketball – Block Party

Indoor Soccer Champions

CoRec Indoor Soccer Champion - Man-Chest-Hair

CoRec Indoor Soccer – Man-Chest-Hair

Men's Indoor Soccer - FC Broiler

Men’s Indoor Soccer – FC Broiler

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